ZooSoc AGM Starts tomorrow (17.05.2021)!

It’s time to elect our upcoming ZooSoc Committee!

Thank you to everyone who applied to be on the committee, we now have a variety of contested and uncontested positions! We’ll be announcing the uncontested positions first and then will follow on with voting for the contested positions throughout the week. Voting will be through google forms where you’ll be able to learn about each candidate and why they’re applying for the role!

Starting Monday we’ll be posting one role a day. Voting will be held over facebook, If you have any questions please get in touch!

! Committee Applications Open !

Fancy a role on the ZooSoc committee this year?

Being part of the committee is a great way to meet other like minded students, chat all things zoology and conservation, learn, and gain some skills along the way. There’s lots of roles available and you can see role descriptions here: https://docs.google.com/…/1yzSpsBCuTEJIcsyBMy1d…/edit….

While some of the roles would benefit from prior experience we want a range of people for next years committee! If you’re interested but want some more information on the roles and what might fit you best please get in touch via our Facebook page or email (guzoosoc@gmail.com).

Application Form:

https://forms.gle/eFKJpSGerqGHD4298

PEOPLE’S CHOICE WINNER

We’ve got our final winner for this years photography competition! Thank you to everyone who voted and congratulations to Meda for her second win! You voted for her beautiful capture of this Eurasian Nuthatch taken in the Botanical Gardens in October last year.

Thank you to everyone who entered, we had lots of amazing entries!

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Fun Fact Friday!

This weeks #FactFriday is looking at the Scottish Crossbill (Loxia scotica) !

The Scottish crossbill is a small passerine bird, belonging to the finch family. It is the only terrestrial vertebrate endemic to the UK and resides solely in Scottish Caledonian forests.

The Scottish crossbill manipulates pine cones with its heavy crossed bill to pull out the seeds, and builds bulky nests of twigs, heather and moss in the branches of Scots pine trees.

The species is morphologically almost identical to red and parrot crossbills and can virtually only be distinguished by its call, although even that needs to be confirmed on a sonogram. There are an estimated 6,800 breeding pairs in Scotland, however, the effects of a warming climate on this species could result in changes to the availability of their food (pine cones) and increase food scarcity. A warmer climate could also result in range expansion of other crossbill species, which may compete with the Scottish crossbill in these areas. Research into this topic is still new.

May be an image of bird and nature

Photography Competition 2021: People’s choice

The committee have voted for the winners in each category but we still have one winner left to choose: The Peoples Choice!

Visit our Facebook page to cast your vote! Each like = 1 vote. The winner will be the photo with the most likes so have a look through and choose your winner!

We’ll close the voting on Friday at 10 pm.

BEST OF THE BRITISH ISLES WINNER!

It’s time to announce the winners of this years photography competition!!

First off its the Best of the British Isles winner, congratulations Hugo on your beautiful capture of this female Red Grouse!

Taken in June 2020 in the Angus Glens, she was acting as a distraction so that her chicks could move to a safer location that was away from the track that we were walking on. We gave her plenty of room and moved on quickly after I took this.

We’ll be announcing the winners of each category today but don’t forget to vote for the people’s choice too! You can find the album on our facebook page, each like = a vote.

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INTERNATIONAL ADMIRATION WINNER!

It’s time to announce the winners of this years photography competition!!

Next we have the International Admiration winner, congratulations Pippa on your incredible Walrus shot taken in Torellneset, Svalbard.

On the edge of a large polar desert island in the Svalbard Archipelago lies a common haul out site for the large arctic beast; the Walrus. Resting in large herds, huddled together, occasionally lifting a head, or rolling over to a more comfortable position. (16/08/19)

We’re announcing the winners of each category today but don’t forget to vote for the people’s choice too! You can find the album on our facebook page, each like = a vote.

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MACROPHOTOGRAPHY WINNER!

It’s time to announce the winners of this years photography competition!!

Congratulations to the Macro winner Meda for your amazing photo of a Marbled White (Melanargia galathea) taken in Varena, Lithuania on 18 July 2020.

We’ve announced the winners of each category today but don’t forget to vote for the people’s choice winner too! You can find the album on our facebook page, each like = a vote.

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Fun Fact Friday!

This week for #FactFriday we are introducing the hummingbird hawk-moth (Macroglossum stellatarum)

The hummingbird hawk-moth is a small, day-flying hawk-moth. It is a summer visitor from May to September in the UK, migrating from Southern Europe in variable numbers each year. Adult hummingbird hawk-moths live for around 7 months.

The hummingbird hawk-moth has greyish-brown forewings, bright orange hindwings, and a greyish body with a broad, black-and-white ‘tail’. it hovers during flight, fluttering its wings so quickly that it can appear orange and makes an audible hum.

The similarity between the hummingbird hawk-moth and hummingbirds is believed to be a result of convergent evolution wherein two species belong to separate families and having no apparent relation with each other develop to be very similar. This is called homoplasy, when a trait has been gained or lost independently in separate lineages over the course of evolution.

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May be a closeup of nature

Fun Fact Friday!

This weeks #FactFriday we’re introducing the common lizard (Zootoca vivipara)!

These reptiles are the most common species of lizard found in the UK. They live for 5-6 years and are found in a variety of colours; brown, grey, olive and black.

They are unusual in that they incubate their eggs inside their body and “give birth” to live young, giving them their viviparity. This is due to it being the northernmost distributed reptile and therefore having to incubate young in these cooler temperature.

When escaping from a predator, the common lizard will shed it’s tail to act as a decoy, letting the lizard escape (in 2 pieces).